NURS FPX 6103 Assessment 1 The History of Nursing Education

NURS FPX 6103 Assessment 1 The History of Nursing Education

The History of Nursing Education

Nursing education had the beginning of the 19th-century evolvement from the apprenticeship-oriented model to the present of delivering well-designed courses in higher learning institutions (McKenna et al., 2020). The transformations of healthcare systems and curriculum changes in nursing education have brought a significant change to the adequacy of nurses in their practice and competencies in different sectors of health. Such changes have transpired for many reasons from historical events which have spanned from the 18th and 21st centuries. This article, in particular, presents the reviews of five predominant historical influences for the nursing profession as well as for its training and the tendencies which will direct the future the profession both in terms of education and practice.
 

Influences from the Past on Nursing and Nursing Education

The most significant roles are marked by the fact that at least three events in the history of nursing and nursing education are (a) the clinical experience of nurses during the Civil War in the USA, (b) the foundation of hospital-based nursing schools, (c) nursing license legislations, (d) the (ANA) American Nurses Association and (e) the introduction of nursing degree programs. This American Civil War undoubtedly acted as the catalyst leading to a series of events that helped to develop professional nursing in the United States. During that time, women were usually regarded as housewives, generally not allowed to work outside and have an influence beyond their households only. Though, during the Civil War many women volunteered to provide care nursing for the soldiers. It helped to remold public opinion on their roles during crises and so the need for proper education. A striking instance of the impact was that AMA’s president, in the year 1868, three years after the termination of the Civil War, authorized the formatting of formal nurse training.

The second event was an idea that was achieved based on Florence Nightingale giving a go and opening a nursing school in London in 1860 after the Crimean War. In the United States, it was not until 1872 with the opening of the New England Hospital for Women that this hospital-based nursing school admitted students where they can earn a diploma after studying for one year (Kreinberg, 2018). The appearance leaped forward from formal training of nurses and having diplomas as a way to succeed in the profession and, moreover, of more training schools. In the part following this, i.e., the year 1901, the framework for nursing licensure was laid down after a move for licensing all nurses through the examination of the International Council of Nurses (ICN) made by (Kreinberg, 2018). Such an event soon caused a flurry of state legislation of nursing licensure in the following years considered similar to the laws in question. Therefore, the requirements for nurses to gain their licensure status were affected as well.

 
The milestone that ended before was the creation of the ANA (Association of Professional Nursing) in the year 1911. This association was formed to promote the quality of nursing care. (Nursing World, 2022). Following its development nurses had a professional body that meant they were being represented, which led to the improvement of their working environment, commitment to ethical and professional standards, and ultimately the development of their profession. The ANA represents a topic for further investigation in light of their implementation in care provision quality. Then the phase of training was reformed where the nurses who attended hospitals were required to have diplomas and nurses in community colleges were required to go to a college or university to obtain a degree level training (Kreinberg, 2018). Whether in freshman college to associate level or beyond, to a baccalaureate career, students need to learn, study and one day contribute to high-quality nursing practice and research.
 

Impacts of Emerging Trends on Nursing and Nursing Education

Multivan trends are an inevitable issue that influence nursing and nursing education in the future. As per Kreinberg who was interviewed in 2018, the key trends have been highlighting care for patients as well as community, prevention, and safety, and the need for equity in healthcare. When reports of successful care begin to emerge in cases where patients are considered to be part of a larger community or society, nursing education and care practice shift from a focus of improving healthcare services for individual patients, families, and communities to a one-stop-shop service that aims at providing complete care for the targeted community as a whole. The pandemic has actually made it evident that the capacity and education of the nursing workforce need to be enhanced in order to cope with the rising demand in the country as shown by the National Academy of Medicine report by Wakefield et al. (2021).

NURS FPX 6103 Assessment 1 The History of Nursing Education

The second feature, which follows the same trend is the growing importance of preventing injuries, safety, and patient self-care, which in turn calls for efficient nurse collaborations to ensure that the patients receive the services from all providers that present the most important situations. It brings system-based practice as it is rooted in a historical basis which encourages the practice of systems thinking and requires more education and practice of nurses (Pluck et al., 2018). The major cultural community trend also demands careful nursing sensitivity training and practice.
 

References

Egenes, K. J. (2018). History of nursing. In G. Roux, & J. A. Halstead, Issues and Trends in Nursing (pp. 3-28). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Kreinberg, M. (2018). A historical overview of nursing. In The Impact of Nursing on the Evolution of Health Care (pp. 21-40). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

McKenna, L., Davis, J., & Williams, E. (2020). Nursing and midwifery education: Historical perspectives. In D. Nestel, G. Reedy, L. McKenna, & S. Gough, Clinical Education for the Health Professions. Singapore: Springer.

Nursing World. (2022). About ANA. Retrieved from https://www.nursingworld.org/ana/about-ana/

Plack, M. M., Goldman, E. F., Scott, A. R., Pintz, C., Herrmann, D., Kline, K., et al. (2018). Systems thinking and systems-based practice across the health professions: An inquiry into definitions, teaching practices, and assessment. Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 30(3), 242-254. https://doi.org/10.1080/10401334.2017.1398654

Wakefield, M. K., Williams, D. R., Menestre, S. L., & Flauber, J. L. (2021). The future of nursing 2020-2030: Charting a path to achieve health equity. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

 
 

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